According to recently published peer-reviewed article in The Open Public Health Journal, there has been interest in the attitude of healthcare providers when it comes to halal pharmaceuticals.

Dr. Deema Jaber led a team of scholars from Zarqa University in Jordan to investigate how such drugs are perceived in the medical community. The article was published around the end of 2023 and was based on a survey of doctors, pharmacists and nurses on how they view halal medicines, which are drugs made to fit with Islamic beliefs, particularly involving ingredients derived from constituents derived from plants, soil, water, and animals slaughtered, according to Islamic law.

Researchers pointed out that there is limited awareness among healthcare providers regarding halal medicine’s ingredients, standards, and manufacturing processes, particularly in the Middle East region.

A total of 381 healthcare providers participated in the study. While they generally had a high level of knowledge, gaps existed, particularly concerning pharmaceutical composition and halal alternatives. Attitudes and perceptions were mostly positive or neutral, though variations occurred among professions.

The team concluded that tailored educational interventions can help address knowledge gaps, while fostering positive attitudes and ensuring culturally sensitive healthcare related halal pharmaceuticals.

According to the article, Islam permits the use of non-halal medicines in life-saving situations, but guidelines for such circumstances require collaboration between Muslim healthcare providers and Islamic scholars. The authors point out that with approximately 1.8 billion Muslims worldwide, the growing Muslim population is driving increased global recognition of halal products that are widely accepted by consumers including those outside of the Middle East.

Susan Barreto
Susan Barreto

Susan is an author with a long-time interest in religion and science. She currently edits Covalence, the Lutheran Alliance for Faith, Science and Technology’s online magazine. She has written articles in The Lutheran and the Zygon Center for Religion and Science newsletter. Susan is a board member for the Center for Advanced Study of Religion and Science, the supporting organization for the Zygon Center and the Zygon Journal. She also co-wrote Our Bodies Are Selves with Dr. Philip Hefner and Dr. Ann Pederson.

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